Thank you.

Thank you.

By E. Adam Porter, Editor

 

Out of an abundance of caution, in these challenging times, for the good of the community, we have all come together to read sentences that begin like this entirely too much over the past month or so. Let’s start over with what really needs to be said: THANK YOU.

Thank you to the phenomenal health care workers whose professional and personal lives have been turned upside down, who go to battle every day, fighting a war with, at least for now, no clear end in sight. You wield all the best weapons at your disposal: education, wisdom, wit, grace, patience, love, and an indomitable spirit. And you keep fighting even when you don’t have everything you need. We love you. All of you. 

Thank you to our law enforcement, who put their lives and health on the line to take care of us, to help the sick and the scared, those who have been victimized, while also dealing with the belligerent, the ignorant, the afflicted, and the evil. Thank you to all the first responders who show up as fast as they can when we are in the worst moments of our lives, who offer aid and comfort in our times of fear and pain. And a special “thank you” to our all-volunteer Emergency Squad and Security Patrol. Each of you is amazing.

Thank you to our military for showing all of us the meaning of duty, honor, and sacrifice. Later this month, we were scheduled to gather, as we do every year, to commemorate those who gave the last full measure of devotion in service to our country and her people. Like many things in this time, that service has been canceled. But nothing will rescind the respect and appreciation we have for those who faithfully served. 

Thank you to our teachers who routinely go far and above the call of duty to educate and protect our children. Teachers who, in these past weeks, have been asked to do even more and found a way to make it work. Parents are working, kids are confused, worried, and scared; and no one knows quite how to use the new technology. They all come to you, at all hours of the day and night. You are therapists as well as educators, and now you are web developers, video producers, and tech support. We see you, teachers. 

Thank you to the tireless volunteers who have poured their talent, time, and effort into meeting so many needs, closing so many gaps, and creating so many smiles. Making and delivering food, sewing and distributing masks, building PPE, picking up necessities, looking for opportunities and always going above and beyond. 

Thank you to the staff, volunteers, and correspondents, and readers who help build The News every month. Thank you to all the journalists out there taking risks to deliver the story. You rarely get mentioned as “essential workers,” but you’re always there. In the middle of the protests, at the hospitals, out in the community, anywhere there’s a story that needs to be told. 

Thank you to local, state, and federal decision-makers who are trying to do an impossible job, without precedent, working without a net. No matter what you do and when you do it, people will say it’s too much or too little. Right now, the big question is “when.” Like as not, it will be both “too late” and “too soon.” You know that, and you have to choose anyway. 

Thank you, business owners. When you started your business, investing all that money, blood, sweat, and tears, you probably didn’t have “Worldwide Pandemic” penciled in the margins of your business plan. And yet here we are. Some of you were forced to close. Others remained open. Nearly everyone has lost a catastrophic amount of business. Many of you have been forced to cut payroll, to lay off or furlough workers. I see you there, sitting up late, wondering how they’re doing, and how you’re going to get through this. 

This is a good spot to offer a huge THANK YOU to our advertisers. Some of you have been with The News since the beginning. Others came along later and stuck with us. Many of you have become our friends. You represent lifelong dreams, private practices, family businesses, and big corporations, the “backbone of America” and the “infrastructure we can’t live without.” To us here at The News, you represent the resources that allow us to do what we do: Deliver positive news, fun opportunities, and current events to the residents of Sun City Center & South Hillsborough County. Thank you for helping us make this happen. 

Thank You to our “essential workers.” I’m guessing, about six weeks ago, you did not realize just how “essential” you are. But we knew. We have food to eat because of you. Our family and our pets are safe and healthy thanks to the risks you are taking every day. Our homes are pest-free, our mail is in the box, our power is on, our trash is gone, and our A/C is working. It’s Florida. It’s May, and summer’s coming… There is no price that can be placed on working air conditioning. To all of you “essential” workers, listen, that word just doesn’t cover what you mean to us. 

Speaking of essential people, Thank You to our artists, musicians, writers, and entertainers who make life – especially life in quarantine – sweeter, brighter, and better. By sharing your talent and hard work, you have given us a priceless gift. Thank you for immersing us in beauty, awe, and transcendence. Thank you for entertainment, for laughs, for illustration, for understanding… for a story to share, a melody to sing, and the rhythm to dance.

Finally, thank you to everyone reading this. The opportunity to share good news is not something that comes along often in the media business. Being part of a positive community news publication is a unique blessing, and I’m grateful.

Be well. Stay safe. Thanks for reading.

Local HLAA Members Make Windowed Masks

Local HLAA Members Make Windowed Masks

Local HLAA Members Make Windowed MasksBy Paula Lickfeldt Imagine being deaf or hearing impaired and using lip-reading as a way of conversing. Now imagine the onset of a pandemic that causes everyone to wear a mask over their mouth, rendering lip-reading...

A National Award for our Emergency Squad and All of Us

A National Award for our Emergency Squad and All of Us

A National Award for our Emergency Squad and All of UsBy Diane M. Loeffler Congratulations to the Sun City Center Emergency Squad. The nation has recognized what we already know, our squad is amazing! Actually, we are all amazing because we support our...

The October 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS!

The October 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS!

In this issue… We relive the fun of the Chamber Business Expo, indulge in a delicious sweet treat, meet some local crafters who are helping people with hearing loss, celebrate the SCC Emergency Squad’s and MOAA’s national awards, learn about...

Chamber Gets Creative with Fall Business Expo

Chamber Gets Creative with Fall Business Expo

Chamber Gets Creative with Fall Business Expo By Bob Sanchez On a warm and sunny Saturday, August 28, the Sun City Center Area Chamber of Commerce held its “Out-of-the-Ordinary” Annual Fall Business Expo Drive Thru in the parking lot of the Prince of Peace...

The September 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS!

The September 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS!

In this issue… We tip our hat in appreciation to longtime community leader, Sam Sudman; sail across the Pacific with some SCC friends; catch up with those industrious Model Railroaders; get a taste of the good food at CC’s Grill; relive a fun...

Fall Business Expo August 28

Fall Business Expo August 28

The Sun City Area Chamber of Commerce presents their Annual Fall Business Expo, a Drive-Thru Event, on Friday, August 28, 2020, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. LocationPrince of Peace Catholic Church702 Valley Forge Blvd. in SCC Claim Your Goodie Bag!This year, Fall...

Saluting all who serve

Saluting all who serve

Saluting all who serve

By E. Adam Porter, Editor

 

The dogs started barking as he came up the walk. They are always excited to see him, as are his not-so-little-anymore brothers, who got to the door just seconds after the Golden Retrievers. My eldest son, Christian, was home for a visit. 

A year removed from finishing his six-year hitch in the United States Air Force, Chris had something on his mind to share with mom and dad. After a few compulsory minutes wrestling with his brothers, he sat down at the dinner table. I offered him a beer. 

So, I’m thinking about re-enlisting, he said. No preamble, just right into it. That’s Chris. Especially when he’s pretty close to a decision about something. Into the Army this time… he said. They have the job I want, and they’ll let me keep my rank. This was offered as tentative information, but I could tell his mind was, mostly, made up. More than mostly, it turned out. 

A few weeks later, I dropped Chris off at the recruiting office. He was scheduled to fly out for Basic Training early the next day. The first of many early days in his imminent future. And, now, we wait. It will be at least five weeks before we will hear from him. He’ll miss Thanksgiving, then Christmas, then New Year’s. He graduates One Station Unit Training (OSUT) on Valentine’s Day. Where to next? Only the Army knows. 

As I sit here, recalling that dinner table revelation, my mind drifts back about twelve years, to the day a 14-year-old kid sat down across from me at a different dinner table in a different house with something similar on his mind. Dad, I think I might want to go into the military. He was tentative then, just feeling out the idea. At 14, four years until graduation seems like an eternity. I told him I would be proud of him, no matter what he chose, and that his mother and I loved him, and wanted him to do what was right for him. Do some research, we said. Talk with family members and friends who served. Take what the recruiters tell you with a grain of salt

As I write this, Chris has just begun his first day of OSUT, along with thousands of other recruit trainees. Unlike most of them, he enters training as a sergeant and a seasoned veteran. Which, I’m sure, the Army DIs will make sure he remembers. It’s their job to prepare these brave young men and women to join the approximately 1.4 million Americans serving in the United States Armed Forces. 

In addition to those currently serving in either active duty or the reserves, there are, depending on your source and the year, between 18 and 22 million military veterans in the U.S. population. Nearly half of these are over 65 years of age. Many volunteered, others were drafted. What every one of them has in common is that, when their country called, they raised their hand. 

On November 11, we come together as a nation to honor their commitment and their sacrifice. A service is planned in SCC at Community Hall. Many others will be held throughout the Tampa Bay area, across the country, and around the world. Like as not, my son will spend the day rucking through the woods with his platoon. 

Tens of thousands of deployed Americans will spend the day set aside to honor them aboard ships with no land in sight, or in tents far from home, or on dusty roads somewhere in the desert or in the mountains of some global hotspot. Others will spend the day in tanks stationed along the DMZ in Korea, or in administrative buildings in Kuwait, England, or Germany. Some will be on training missions in undisclosed areas or piloting aircraft to enforce no-fly zones. They live and work and play on bases set behind tall fences, a world removed from civilian life; or they live next door, sharing the same roads, shopping at the same supermarkets, and sending their kids to the same schools as you and me. 

Over the past decade or so, it’s become cliché to “Thank a Veteran,” almost as reflexive as saying, “Happy Holidays.” While the impulse is good, we should be careful not to allow the well-wishes to become mundane. Honoring veterans, no matter when, where, or why they served, is the duty of every American. Whether or not we agree with the reasons or the wars, all of us who live in the Land of the Free should appreciate everyone who swore to “support and defend the Constitution, and to bear true faith and allegiance to the same…”

It’s the least we can do for those who put the most on the line. 

NOTE: Statistics taken from Pew Research, Department of Defense, the Department of Veteran Affairs, and the US Census.

Photo Credit: Military TImes (David H. Lipp/Air National Guard)

 

 

Local HLAA Members Make Windowed Masks

Local HLAA Members Make Windowed Masks

Local HLAA Members Make Windowed MasksBy Paula Lickfeldt Imagine being deaf or hearing impaired and using lip-reading as a way of conversing. Now imagine the onset of a pandemic that causes everyone to wear a mask over their mouth, rendering lip-reading...

A National Award for our Emergency Squad and All of Us

A National Award for our Emergency Squad and All of Us

A National Award for our Emergency Squad and All of UsBy Diane M. Loeffler Congratulations to the Sun City Center Emergency Squad. The nation has recognized what we already know, our squad is amazing! Actually, we are all amazing because we support our...

The October 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS!

The October 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS!

In this issue… We relive the fun of the Chamber Business Expo, indulge in a delicious sweet treat, meet some local crafters who are helping people with hearing loss, celebrate the SCC Emergency Squad’s and MOAA’s national awards, learn about...

Chamber Gets Creative with Fall Business Expo

Chamber Gets Creative with Fall Business Expo

Chamber Gets Creative with Fall Business Expo By Bob Sanchez On a warm and sunny Saturday, August 28, the Sun City Center Area Chamber of Commerce held its “Out-of-the-Ordinary” Annual Fall Business Expo Drive Thru in the parking lot of the Prince of Peace...

The September 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS!

The September 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS!

In this issue… We tip our hat in appreciation to longtime community leader, Sam Sudman; sail across the Pacific with some SCC friends; catch up with those industrious Model Railroaders; get a taste of the good food at CC’s Grill; relive a fun...

Fall Business Expo August 28

Fall Business Expo August 28

The Sun City Area Chamber of Commerce presents their Annual Fall Business Expo, a Drive-Thru Event, on Friday, August 28, 2020, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. LocationPrince of Peace Catholic Church702 Valley Forge Blvd. in SCC Claim Your Goodie Bag!This year, Fall...

Building Characters

Building Characters

Building Characters

By E. Adam Porter

Editor, News of SCC & South County

 

Halloween is right around the corner, which means the Great Debate has commenced at the Porter house. Not, thankfully, ‘Who Gets My Vote,’ but ‘Who Wears What Costume?’ My younger boys are at that perfect age where the magic of Halloween is still very real, and they are big enough to carry their own candy sack. 

When they select a costume, their purpose is to become that character, at least for the evening. To assume what, in their kid brains, these characters would be like. Their imaginations have a lot of help in the form of their favorite books, movies, and TV shows. Not to mention Dad’s stories. Hence the ongoing debate, which ping-pongs between “I’m going to be something completely new and different” to “I’m going as the same character as last year.”

This is the continual tug and pull between the familiar and the risk of trying something new. Each kid manages this challenge in a different way. Growing up, my eldest, who inherited a fathomless well of creativity from his Mama, always had the best Halloween costumes, most of them homemade. If a character called for armor, he made it. Makeup? He learned how to perfect the look. Props? Gathered in advance or built on the fly. Sometimes this led to unexpected results. The year he went as the Incredible Hulk, all his green makeup washed off while bobbing for apples, so he finished the party as “Bruce Banner.” Another year, he won the costume contest at our neighborhood Halloween party dressed as a character from the movie, Hot Fuzz. Then there was the year he and a friend were such convincing “homeless people” that other trick-or-treaters offered them cash donations, even though they insisted that they were just in costume. This year, though, will be a bit different. Chris enlisted in the US Army, after a brief stint as a civilian, when his seven-year tour in the USAF ended. So, for Halloween this year, he will be back in BDUs, rucking through the woods somewhere in Missouri.

My middle kid has somewhat peculiar and entirely specific tastes. Last year, he wanted to go as a character from a cartoon that’s been off the air for years. No costume shop in the county had anything close to the look, so we turned to Google. Fortunately, someone on the other side of the planet did not let us down. We found a movie-specific replica, which he wore at least once a week until the costume was so torn and threadbare even duct tape failed him. This year, something similar. We ended up piecing together his costume from various parts. When someone recognized what he was, he kept smiling and hasn’t stopped since.

My youngest is more experience-driven. He’s cool with just about any costume, because most of the fun, for him, is riding through the neighborhood in the back of the pickup, shouting “trick or treat” and getting gobs of gobstoppers and other sweet treats. The key, though, is that his costume must also be something he will wear for play throughout the year. Over the years, he’s been a fireman, a cop, Iron Man, and a ninja. This year, he’s weighing astronaut, pirate, Captain America or To Be Determined. Kid likes to keep his options open, which leads us back around to the endless “Who will I be?” conversations. 

As I was listening to this lively debate for the umpteenth time, I got to thinking about how it’s not too much different than the decision we all face when we wake up every morning: “Will I be the same person I was, or will I look for some way to grow, to learn, to explore?”

For many reading this, life is about the pursuit, about learning and trying new things. It’s a lesson many of us should take to heart. Far too many people never really go anywhere or do anything. We put it off for a tomorrow that never comes. Life, as they say, gets in the way. Kids, work, bills, cutting the grass every week, and other perpetual chores seem to suck all the potential and adventure out of life. 

Thing is, no matter our age or place in life, apathy, distraction, and redundancy are choices. And, if we’re not careful, those choices become habits. That’s one of the reasons, in The News, we choose to focus on stories about people doing new, fun, and interesting things: people picking up a softball bat or a basketball for the first time in decades, dusting off a musical instrument, pursuing a new craft or hobby, or heading out on an adventure. No matter what that “new” choice is, the result is a mixture of learning new things and becoming a new person. Our habits, our priorities, even our brains, are reordered by embracing something unfamiliar.

In The Fellowship of the Ring, JRR Tolkien has his reluctant adventurer, Bilbo Baggins, tell his impetuous nephew, Frodo: “You step into the road, and if you don’t keep your feet, there is no knowing where you might be swept off to.” It’s a truism Bilbo experienced first-hand. He went There and Back Again and became a new person. A dynamic that World War I veteran, Tolkien, was intimately familiar with. And that’s the point. When we set out to experience something new, we’re not entirely sure who we will become along the way. 

Kids find it easy to wear and shed different costumes, because their young brains thrive on experimentation. We tend to have a harder time with it. Comfort and routine, and memories of past mistakes, keep us from stepping out onto the proverbial road. Sometimes, though, it helps if we dress the part, and there are plenty of opportunities to do just that this month.

 

Local HLAA Members Make Windowed Masks

Local HLAA Members Make Windowed Masks

Local HLAA Members Make Windowed MasksBy Paula Lickfeldt Imagine being deaf or hearing impaired and using lip-reading as a way of conversing. Now imagine the onset of a pandemic that causes everyone to wear a mask over their mouth, rendering lip-reading...

A National Award for our Emergency Squad and All of Us

A National Award for our Emergency Squad and All of Us

A National Award for our Emergency Squad and All of UsBy Diane M. Loeffler Congratulations to the Sun City Center Emergency Squad. The nation has recognized what we already know, our squad is amazing! Actually, we are all amazing because we support our...

The October 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS!

The October 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS!

In this issue… We relive the fun of the Chamber Business Expo, indulge in a delicious sweet treat, meet some local crafters who are helping people with hearing loss, celebrate the SCC Emergency Squad’s and MOAA’s national awards, learn about...

Chamber Gets Creative with Fall Business Expo

Chamber Gets Creative with Fall Business Expo

Chamber Gets Creative with Fall Business Expo By Bob Sanchez On a warm and sunny Saturday, August 28, the Sun City Center Area Chamber of Commerce held its “Out-of-the-Ordinary” Annual Fall Business Expo Drive Thru in the parking lot of the Prince of Peace...

The September 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS!

The September 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS!

In this issue… We tip our hat in appreciation to longtime community leader, Sam Sudman; sail across the Pacific with some SCC friends; catch up with those industrious Model Railroaders; get a taste of the good food at CC’s Grill; relive a fun...

Fall Business Expo August 28

Fall Business Expo August 28

The Sun City Area Chamber of Commerce presents their Annual Fall Business Expo, a Drive-Thru Event, on Friday, August 28, 2020, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. LocationPrince of Peace Catholic Church702 Valley Forge Blvd. in SCC Claim Your Goodie Bag!This year, Fall...

Celebrating Independence Together

Celebrating Independence Together

Celebrating Independence Together

By E. Adam Porter

 

The first week in July, every year, my extended family gathers at the beach in my hometown for a weeklong reunion. It’s a wonderful, relaxing time of sharing life together, filled with the familiar aromas of salt air, sunscreen, and delicious grilled meat; of days spent building sandcastles with the little ones and being buried in the sand; of shared jokes and singing, of snorkeling, fishing, spectacular skimboarding wipeouts, walks on the beach, and magnificent sunsets.

We catch up with each other, talk about days gone by, and pass our collective wisdom along to the young ones. The kids giggle as we demonstrate the stingray shuffle, do their best to listen to our lectures about the dangers of riptides, and experience temporary hearing loss when reminded they need another application of sunblock. We collect shells and sand dollars, spot pods of dolphin, and experience the patience-testing chore of untangling an open reel.

Talking with my brothers and our friends, we recall when we were kids with sandy shorts and pruny fingers, begging for Just Five More Minutes swimming in the water or playing in the sand. Those days really don’t seem so long ago… until my niece runs by, chasing her two-year-old daughter. I glance at my brother, thinking: “Wasn’t that us, just yesterday?”

Mom sits under the umbrella and shares stories about the island the way it used to be. We all chime in, reminiscing about fishing off the city pier and stores with shell parking lots. About coquina concrete and small, single-story homes with jalousie windows. The soda bottle vending machine at the bike shop. Building crab traps in the yard, smoked mullet and fried grouper back when the fishing was really good. Sunday afternoons trading stories with the liveaboards at the marina and weekdays cruising the bay after school.

The nostalgia is hypnotic and cathartic, a welcome port in the storms of life, and an oral history of The Way We Were. As kids, we never realized we were collecting memories, but now we’re passing that torch to our children and grandchildren… or would, if we could get them out of the water (five more minutes, pleeeeeeeeezzz!).

During this week, on July 4th, my family comes together with everyone on the island and across the country to commemorate our Founding Fathers’ Declaration of Independence from tyranny. It is, for the kids and for me, one of the best days of Family Beach Week, every year.

The celebration begins with the annual Independence Day Parade, watching the Privateers cruise their benevolent pirate ship down the main drag, tossing beads and firing their water cannons. Far below, on the sidewalk, the kids — armed to the teeth with Super Soakers — give as good as they get.

Later that evening, thousands of tourists and locals line the strand to enjoy one of the most impressive fireworks displays anywhere. Seven miles of sky flowers paint the twilight with booming radiance from horizon to horizon. Beneath that technicolor sky, the kids laugh and dance and sing, waving sparklers to write their names on the night.

Once again, watching them takes me back. When I lean forward to offer a few terse warnings about firework safety, I hear echoes of my parents. And that gets me thinking about how time and circumstance transforms accident-prone children gleefully waving flaming sticks into parents who repeat cautionary tales before lighting similar sticks for their own kids.

Further up the beach, close to the water line, the older teens and twenty-somethings have their own lighters, as well as much larger and more dynamic flaming sticks. The older adults toss them a few cursory safety tips, which they largely ignore. They’ve heard it all before. Soon, though, someone hollers and comes running for some ice from the cooler. We old guys glance at each other and grin. Sometimes, singed fingers are the best way to reinforce the correlation of responsibility and freedom.

And, that gets me thinking about the birthright our Founding Fathers have passed down to us. Defending our Independence is a shared responsibility, a commission handed down by that first generation of Americans. The Founders declared that freedom is every human’s indisputable right. Then they risked everything to prove it, because maintaining freedom requires personal responsibility. Something I remind my boys at every opportunity. Independence is the right of every person, and it’s worth celebrating. It’s also worth defending… I’m glad we’re able to do both together.

Happy Independence Day. 

 

 

Fall Business Expo August 28

Fall Business Expo August 28

The Sun City Area Chamber of Commerce presents their Annual Fall Business Expo, a Drive-Thru Event, on Friday, August 28, 2020, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. LocationPrince of Peace Catholic Church702 Valley Forge Blvd. in SCC Claim Your Goodie Bag!This year, Fall...

The August 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS

The August 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS

In this issue… We explore Busch Gardens, learn about increases to the county meal program, visit a local shelter that CAREs about homeless pets, meet the new SCC Community Association president, get a refresher on Florida traffic laws, review...

HCSO Community Resource Giveaway

HCSO Community Resource Giveaway

HCSO Community Resource Giveaway on August 13By Deputy Jeffery Merry, HCSO On Thursday, August 13, from 8-11 a.m., at Community Hall, 1910 S. Pebble Beach Blvd., the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office will be giving away several community resources,...

The JULY 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS

The JULY 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS

In this issue… The community comes together to celebrate our healthcare heroes, and we catch up with the Pelican Players. We review updates to the COVID-19 guidelines, show you where to get tested, fill you in on new procedures for the...

CA President Sudman Resigns

CA President Sudman Resigns

On July 1, SCCCA President Sam Sudman resigned, effective immediately, citing personal reasons. Sam has done quite a lot for this community; so, if you have a chance, reach out to thank him for his years of dedicated service to SCC.The CA Board met on July...

Boys & Girls Club School Supply Drive

Boys & Girls Club School Supply Drive

The 2020-21 school year begins on August 10, 2020, and the Wimauma Boys & Girls Club needs your help! They are now accepting school supplies through Monday, August 3, 2020. Collection sites include: Sun City Center United Methodist Church1210 W. Del...

Florida Re-Opens: Phase 2

Florida Re-Opens: Phase 2

As of Friday, June 5, 2020, all but three Florida counties – Palm Beach, Broward, and Miami-Dade – have now entered “Phase 2” of reopening after the COVID-19 outbreak. Here’s a breakdown of what that means in a handy chart provided by Gov. Ron DeSantis’...

The JUNE 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS

The JUNE 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS

In this issue… We celebrate our healthcare heroes, review updates to the COVID-19 guidelines, shine the spotlight on a local disaster relief crew, look at life during lockdown, plan ahead for emergencies, review hurricane preparedness tips,...

Thank you.

Thank you.

By E. Adam Porter, Editor Out of an abundance of caution, in these challenging times, for the good of the community, we have all come together to read sentences that begin like this entirely too much over the past month or so. Let’s start over with what...

The May 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS

The May 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS

In this issue… We review COVID-19 updates and get some information on testing, thank our SCC Emergency Squad and Security Patrol volunteers for staying “on the job” through the pandemic, and take a look at how some of the talented and creative...

Vesta Thanks Community Volunteers

Vesta Thanks Community Volunteers

Vesta Thanks Community VolunteersPlease help if you can, and if you need help, keep reading. A huge thank you to those who participated in our efforts to feed health care workers, first responders, and volunteers in the Sun City Center area. Over 270...

Local HLAA Members Make Windowed Masks

Local HLAA Members Make Windowed Masks

Local HLAA Members Make Windowed MasksBy Paula Lickfeldt Imagine being deaf or hearing impaired and using lip-reading as a way of conversing. Now imagine the onset of a pandemic that causes everyone to wear a mask over their mouth, rendering lip-reading...

A National Award for our Emergency Squad and All of Us

A National Award for our Emergency Squad and All of Us

A National Award for our Emergency Squad and All of UsBy Diane M. Loeffler Congratulations to the Sun City Center Emergency Squad. The nation has recognized what we already know, our squad is amazing! Actually, we are all amazing because we support our...

The October 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS!

The October 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS!

In this issue… We relive the fun of the Chamber Business Expo, indulge in a delicious sweet treat, meet some local crafters who are helping people with hearing loss, celebrate the SCC Emergency Squad’s and MOAA’s national awards, learn about...

Chamber Gets Creative with Fall Business Expo

Chamber Gets Creative with Fall Business Expo

Chamber Gets Creative with Fall Business Expo By Bob Sanchez On a warm and sunny Saturday, August 28, the Sun City Center Area Chamber of Commerce held its “Out-of-the-Ordinary” Annual Fall Business Expo Drive Thru in the parking lot of the Prince of Peace...

The September 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS!

The September 2020 NEWS is HOT off the PRESS!

In this issue… We tip our hat in appreciation to longtime community leader, Sam Sudman; sail across the Pacific with some SCC friends; catch up with those industrious Model Railroaders; get a taste of the good food at CC’s Grill; relive a fun...

Fall Business Expo August 28

Fall Business Expo August 28

The Sun City Area Chamber of Commerce presents their Annual Fall Business Expo, a Drive-Thru Event, on Friday, August 28, 2020, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. LocationPrince of Peace Catholic Church702 Valley Forge Blvd. in SCC Claim Your Goodie Bag!This year, Fall...